Wildlife Ecology and Conservation department

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation department

Research in Wildlife Conservation and Management

Research directly relevant to management of wildlife and their habitats is an important focus of the Department. Departmental faculty work closely with stakeholders in Florida and elsewhere to pursue important applied research questions using approaches integrating modeling and empirical approaches.

Examples of programs:

  • Effects of forest management activities on wildlife (Dr. Holly Ober). This research evaluates the ways that disturbance events can alter composition and age structure of forest vegetation, which in turn influences resource availability for wildlife. Projects include evaluation of the influence of timing and frequency of prescribed burning in pine forests on bat communities, and the short- and longterm influence of repeated pine straw harvest on arthropod abundance and community composition.
  • Population ecology of mammals (Dr. Madan Oli). This research program integrates field data and models to address basic and applied ecological questions. Projects include application of partial life cycle models to population dynamics and evaluation of the demographic mechanisms underlying population dynamics of natural populations.
  • Ecology of introduced animal populations (Dr. Mike Moulton). This work focuses on the ecology of introduced vertebrates, with special interest in introduced birds and lizards. Specifically, questions concerning why some species tend to succeed in most places where they have been introduced whereas others tend to fail, and why species introductions tend to succeed in some places but not others are considered. Projects include biogeography and community ecology of introduced geckos in Florida and spread of the Eurasian Collared Dove, and numerous species of introduced parrots in Florida.
  • Cervidae Health Research Initiative (Dr. Samantha Wisely). This initiative seeks to promote interdisciplinary science, education, and outreach that increase the health and production of captive cervids in a sustainable manner and promotes the health of native wildlife and the ecosystems in which they live.